How to make pickled purslanes

How to make pickled purslanes

 Winter is coming and the "supplies gathering time" came. Yay!  Growing up it was always a pleasure watching my grandmas and my mum sealing all these vegetables' freshness and magic in jars for the dark cold days that would come. Basically, pickled vegetables, apart from being salty and sour = a total bliss, work totally out with all my favorite winter food. And I mean the soups and roasted meat. So win-win. 

How to make pickled purslanes

The following recipe is a total favorite one that I learned from my grandma and it's a rife one among the Pontiacs in northern Greece. (The quantities depend on the jars' size.)

Ingredients: (for 2 middle jars)

:: 2 big bunches of purslanes

:: white wine's vinegar

:: 3 garlic gloves

:: salt, ground pepper

Procedure:

1) Put the jars and their caps in a pot with boiling water to be sterilized and let them aside when after the first boil. 

2) Wash very well the purslanes to clean them from dirt and any living organism. :) Then, chop off the thick twigs, cut the remaining branches in smaller pieces and give them a boil for 1'-2' with the garlic cloves. Don't leave them for too long, we want them to stay bright green and crunchy.

3) Take the sterilized jars out of the pot with a clean plier. Depending on the jar's size, fill the 1/5 of its volume with white vinegar. Then load the jars with the purslanes, garlic gloves and their water. Add salt and pepper, close tightly their caps and turn them upside down.

4) Wrap them with a towel and leave them like that until they cool. If you intend to eat them in the near future, you could not seal them but cover the surface of the vase with olive oil and keep them for for a week max in the refrigerator.

How to make pickled purslanes
How to make pickled purslanes
How to make pickled purslanes

More -delicious- food in jars to come!

xo

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Despina Kortesidou

Despina Kortesidou, a master student (hello neuroscience!) and a born adventurer, founded In Whirl of Inspiration, back in 2011 when she was (just) a biology student. She loves sharing advice for eating healthier, or inspiring you to cover yourself with plants, color and confetti. She started teaching , recently, online courses for those loving food, plants and everything in between, and she has the time of her life. She has a soft spot for cheese, elder people and overanalyzation.